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Arizona Cardinals Take OT Nate Potter In The 7th Round Of The 2012 NFL Draft

Cardinals fans, your prayers have been answered. Note Potter is added to two other day 3 OL draft picks for the Cards Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-US PRESSWIRE
Cardinals fans, your prayers have been answered. Note Potter is added to two other day 3 OL draft picks for the Cards Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-US PRESSWIRE

Barring a trade back into the seventh round, the Cardinals have ended their 2012 NFL Draft with the selection of Boise State offensive tackle Nate Potter. While the Cardinals previous two offensive line selections will require some technical work with Russ Grimm, Potter will most definitely need to spend some time in the weight room with John Lott. Potter possesses very good technique, as well as the uncoachable lateral quickness required for an offensive tackle.

Hit the jump for more on Potter

While being oft mocked in the third to fifth rounds in most mock drafts, many NFL teams clearly didn't value Potter very high due to his lack of strength. However, Potter does have the frame required to add the necessary strength. Potter also does not have the greatest arm length for an offensive tackle, further adding reason for his falling.

It would appear as though Potter possesses the same flaws as OT prospects Jonathan Martin and Riley Rieff. Like Martin, Potter suffers from a lack of power and a mean streak, but both do have the frame to add on weight. As well both Martin and Potter have very good technique and quick feet. Like Rieff, Potter has the infamous short arms, which may limit him to staying on the right side of the line.

Overall, Potter is a very useful backup linemen to have on the roster, and if he fills out his frame could even become a starting offensive tackle. For those who were complaining earlier about the Cardinals ignoring their offensive line in the draft, Saturday's selections for the Cardinals should dispel though accusations as they drafted three high ceiling linemen for their coaching staff to develop.